ASAE’s CAE Program Granted NCCA Accreditation


ASAE and the CAE Commission announced last year that the Certified Association Executive (CAE) program has been granted accreditation by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCAA). The announcement of accreditation coincided with the 50th anniversary of the CAE program.

NCCA accreditation provides independent validation that the CAE program meets or exceeds twenty-one standards concerning various aspects of the certification program including its purpose, structure, governance, psychometric foundation, policies and procedures. Accreditation validates the integrity of the program, and is a mark of quality. Earning accreditation is a public demonstration of ASAE and the CAE Commission’s commitment to the CAE credential as a true professional certification.

1099 Provision Voted Down in Senate…

On February 2nd the U.S. Senate voted to repeal the provision of last year’s health care legislation, that if it passes is expected to cause heavy tax information reporting requirements on small businesses AND nonprofit organizations.

The Senate approved an amendment (to an unrelated bill) that would repeal the 1099 requirement. The underlying bill with the amendment intact still has to pass the House of Representatives and be signed by the President to become law.

There appears to be bipartisan support for repeal. The President signaled his support for repeal in his State of the Union address last month. A GOP dominated house should make passage a certainty but if any problems develop with the underlying bill an alternative vehicle will be needed to effect repeal.

L&M wishes to thank Jay Hauck, Esq. of Hauck and Associates, an AMC in Washington, DC for monitoring this important repeal legislation.

Messaging Anti-Abuse Working Group (MAAWG)

MAAWG’s next member meeting will be February 21 – 24 in Orlando, FL. Keynote speakers for this meeting will include Rob McKenna, incoming president of the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG), and David Vladeck, head of the U.S. consumer protection bureau. The focus on the February meeting is the protection of consumers in an evolving cyber future. Click here for more information about MAAWG and the upcoming meeting.

SCSI Trade Association (STA)

STA Announces 2011 Board of Directors

The SCSI Trade Association elected the 2011 board of directors from their membership at their annual meeting earlier this month. Re-elected to the position as president was Harry Mason of LSI Corp., who will serve as STA president. Also re-elected was Martin Czekalski of Seagate Technology, who will serve as vice president. Two new members, Alan Yoder of NetApp and Dan Reno of Western Digital, joined the Board. All other Board members served last year.

“In 2010, STA introduced our MultiLink SAStm initiative, which we will continue to develop and promote throughout 2011,” said Harry Mason, president of STA. “In addition, STA held the eleventh industry SAS plugfest, which included the first coordinated Mini-SAS active cable testing program. STA has numerous 2011 initiatives focused on advancing every level of tiered storage, including low-latency storage device like SSDs. Industry education through various outlets, including storage conferences, trade shows, electronic journals, and other publications, will continue to be a focus for the organization.

Click here for more information about the 2011 board and 2011 initiatives for STA.

AMC-Managed and Standalone Organizations — A Sibling Study


CONCLUSION: Based on a comparative analysis of two parallel operating ratio studies of AMC-managed and standalone organizations, AMC-managed organizations reap considerable qualitative and quantitative advantages for membership-based organizations up to $5M in annual revenue. These results are likely valid for organizations above $5M in annual revenue, however, there was not a sufficient number of organizations above $5M in the study of AMC-managed organizations to draw any conclusions about those organizations.

IMPLICATION: Standalone organizations up to $5M in annual operating revenue should answer one question: “Are we receiving the return on our management model investment, given that on average, we may be spending 50% more for the resources to manage our organization than if we were managed by an AMC?”

AMC and Standalone Organizations – a Sibling Study

Are AMC-Managed Organizations Recession Resistant?

Based on results of recent study, it appears they are!


OVERVIEW: The current economic climate is having an impact on associations, just as it is on virtually all business sectors. This paper reports on a recent study showing that until 2007, about 30% of all organizations up to $5M in annual revenue operated at a loss. But, organizations that employ their own staff, lease their own office space and incur their own capital expenses (aka: standalone) were nearly twice as likely to have ended 2008 with deficits than AMC-managed organizations. More than 50% of standalone organizations with up to $5M in annual operating revenue operated at a loss that year! The reduction for AMC-managed organizations between 2007 and 2008 was a nominal 7% — two-thirds of AMC-managed organizations reported a surplus in 2008! Therefore, the answer to the question posed in the title would seem to be a resounding “yes.”

Download study

IMPLICATION: Standalone organizations up to $5M in annual operating revenue should answer one question: “Are we receiving a return on investment in our management model, given that on average we may be spending 50% more for that management approach than if we were managed by an AMC — especially given the performance benefits produced by AMCs?”

The Venturesome Economy: How Innovation Sustains Prosperity in a More Connected World

by: Amar Bhidé
Princeton University Press
© 2008
Reviewed by: Michael LoBue
While the major theme of this book is about national policy issues- relating how to best to stimulate innovation to drive productivity- it contains equally valuable lessons for executives and managers relating to concerns of the firm.
Professor Bhidé bases his analysis on an extremely robust 3-level model of innovation. This model deserves more attention as it clearly expands the dimensions of innovation beyond the typical models, which focus attention, resources and research only on basic R&D where the number of patents filed is the primary metric of measurement.
If there’s one book on innovation to read — this is the one!

Uniting the Virtual Workforce – Transforming Leadership and Innovation in the Globally Integrated Enterprise


by: Karen Sobel-Lojeski

       Richard R. Reilly
       Wiley; Microsoft Executive Leadership Series
       © 2008
       Reviewed by: Michael LoBue

The topics and discoveries authors Sobel-Lojeski and Reilly discuss in this book are valuable, if not essential, for any enterprise during any economic climate.

I found their work particularly poignent in two important ways. First, that distance is not just a physical condition, but a psychological condition that often exists between workers. And, that these psychological gulfs can have a more significant impact on the results than physical distances.

Second, they present a framework for understanding and measuring these psychological distances in their construct of the Virtual Distance Model.
The Virtual Distance Model is comprehensive and comprised of three major parts: physical distance; operational distance; and affinity distance.

Their writing style is easy on the reader and as much for line managers as it is for C-suite executives. For that matter, it also contains useful concepts and practical lessons for entrepreneurs and professional sole-practitioners looking to improve their effectiveness working in teams, working in teams within an office, or worlds and cultures spanning wide time-zones.

Silos, Politics and Turf Wars

by: Patrick Lencioni
Jossey-Bass (A Wiley Imprint)
© 2006
Reviewed by: Michael LoBue

This is one of Lencioni’s “management fables,” illustrating just how insidiously silos grow within organizations. But there’s good news. There are effective techniques for dealing with the “silo-problem,” and Lencioni shares his techniques at the end of the book, which are almost better than his fable.

The story line he uses is clever — a young professional, Jude Cousins, is beginning to build a consulting practice and realizes that he needs a more stable offering upon which to build a business out of consulting. In the course of searching for a focus, he interviews prospective clients around their problems and discovers a common theme across a very diverse set of organizations, including a small manufacturing firm, a hospital, a hotel and a church.

This is an easy and quick read, but this should not be confused with light or without value.

This book does not apply directly to AMC-managed associations, but it’s not a large leap to recognize the same phenomenon and risks caused by “internal silos” being constructed that separate organizations from the professions or markets they were formed to serve. We can think of this as the “inside – outside silo”.

Simple take-away: “silos are bad for things other than agricultural products – especially organizations!”

[Guide to] Management Ideas and Gurus

by: Tim Hindle
The Economist in association with Profile Books Ltd.
© 2008
Reviewed by: Michael LoBue

This is more of a readable reference book than a guidebook, containing 105 major management ideas, theories, fads and influential organziations in the 20th century. And that’s just Part 1. Part 2 is an equally concise and rich profile of the leading management “gurus” of the same era — 56 in all!

This is not the type of book that you’d want to read for an extended period of time. I found that I could handle only a few “ideas” at a time because each description is self-contained and dodn’t necessarily connect with each of the other descriptions. Each description is written in a classic Economist’s style: Concise, powerful structure and packed full of useful information! Hindle follows his formula well; two pages for each idea and for each guru! (unclear-two pages for each guru and two for each idea? Or two pages total for both?)

For example, if one has wondered about Six Sigma, the author tells us that it grew out of the work of Joseph Juran (then provides the pages this “guru” is featured in Part 2. This structure illustratesthe simple essence of the idea- how it was originally applied, and how it might be applied today. Each description contains a list of further reading on the topic.

Maybe it is a “guide” after all? A “guide” or a “reference” matters not. Whether management is your interest or profession, this book belongs on your bookshelf and will be dog-eared soon after it arrives.